Mackintosh Toffee = Hard Crack – Not Real Crack!

O.K. – let’s toss a few factoids onto the kitchen table.  Yes, most candy has a lot of sugar in it.  However, the texture of the finished product will be affected by the actual sugar concentration.  Just heating a water and fine sugar mixture – and as the water evaporates, the remaining sugar concentration increases.  I have just vague memories from my Chemistry 101 class way back in 1968 (most likely because it was an 8:00 AM lecture and it was hard to stay awake, but that’s another story for another time…) – the main idea to take away is that the boiling point of any sugar solution rises as the concentration of the solution rises.

Therefore, at a specific temperature range, the concentration of the sugar mixture changes (generally increases).  Bottom Line?  High temperatures equals greater sugar concentrations.  And this situation leads to hard, brittle candies versus lower temperatures that produce softer candies.  Take a gander at the table below – from what I see, Toffee is created by higher temperatures versus caramel which is created by lower temperatures.

You can’t argue that the Nestle Mackintosh Toffee pieces in the 170 gram bag are marked as “toffee”.  If you want to toss the “caramel” noun around just to confuse the issue – then go to it.  I will always be a BIG fan of the Mack Toffee no matter what the actual shape they sell it.  My recommendation is try the individually wrapped pieces.  You can’t buy the bar or slab style any longer.  However, you will always have your memories.  Me?  I would rather have the toffee pieces.  100 percent of something in my pocket is a whole lot better than just some old memories.  Remember: You can’t eat your memories – but you sure can eat (and bake…and enjoy…) Nestle Mackintosh Toffee pieces!

Stage

Temperature

Sugar
concentration

thread
(example: syrup)

110
to 112 °C (230 to 234 °F)

80%

soft
ball (example: fudge)

112
to 116 °C (234 to 241 °F)

85%

firm
ball (example: caramel candy)

118
to 120 °C (244 to 248 °F)

87%

hard
ball (example: nougat)

121
to 130 °C (250 to 266 °F)

90%

soft
crack (example: salt water taffy)

132
to 143 °C (270 to 289 °F)

95%

hard
crack (example: toffee)

146
to 154 °C (295 to 309 °F)

99%

 

Toffee Is Delightful at Night